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"Dr. Gareau, your works on confocal microscopy were the starting point for my Ph.D. programme."  ~Maria Contaldo, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli
Dr. Daniel S. Gareau is Scientist, CEO, NIH Program Director, Father and Music Enthusiast. As an Instructor In Clinical Investigation at The Rockefeller University, he focuses on diagnostic screening technology for early skin cancer detection, rapid bedside pathology and therapeutics development. Ongoing clinical and basic science studies include the Melanoma Advanced Imaging Dermatoscope in collaboration with Dr. Sancy Leachman of Oregon Health and Science University and Dr. Ken Linden of The University of California Irvine, Video Assisted Micrographic Surgery in collaboration with Dr. John Carucci of New York University, and Imaging Biomarkers in 3D-Printed Tissue Organoids in Colaboration with Marc Ferrer at the National Center for Advancing Clinical and Translational Sciences.

Shifting the visual language of medical technology

In this groundbreaking talk, biophotonic engineer Daniel Gareau shows us new technology that depicts cellular imaging, in a bid to make it more accessible to doctors. By shifting the visual language to something more familiar, this technology may have the potential of positively impacting doctors' daily practice.

Shifting the visual language of medical technology (mobile)

In this groundbreaking talk, biophotonic engineer Daniel Gareau shows us new technology that depicts cellular imaging, in a bid to make it more accessible to doctors. By shifting the visual language to something more familiar, this technology may have the potential of positively impacting doctors' daily practice.

Automated pigment network detection leads to imaging biomarkers for melanoma screening:

Automated detection of pigment network
In our study, we developed an automated approach for generating quantitative image analysis metrics (imaging biomarkers) that are then analyzed with a set of 13 machine learning algorithms to generate an overall risk score that is called a Q-score. This approach yielded 98% sensitivity and 36% specificity for melanoma detection, approaching sensitivity/specificity of expert lesion evaluation. Importantly, we found strong spectral dependence of many imaging biomarkers in blue or red color channels, suggesting the need to optimize spectral evaluation of pigmented lesions.

Stage-scanning, Line-scanning Confocal Microscope

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A stage-scanning, line-scanning confocal microscope is under development for rapid, noninvasive imaging of whole biological tissue.

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